Decision Making

Giving Direction

In this picture, I was doing a hard work, reading a map, the map of Singapore. It was our first time to be in Singapore. Very exiting traveling, but also challenging. My family and I, without accompanied by someone who recognize Singapore well, did our journey to find some iconic places in the Marelion country.

As I’ve said, this traveling is challenging. One of, and the most, defiant is finding direction. We had the map, but it’s not that easy to go to the places that we want to visit. In this small team, as a husband and father, I responsible to check the map and determine the direction–as the picture indicates. Honestly I’m not too good in using map. Consequently, we spent a lot of time in finding the direction.

As a father and husband, in terms of determine direction, I have a bigger responsibility at home than finding the way in Singapore. The decision that I have to make as the head of the family is more significant than to discover a right road to Marina Bay or Orchard street.

Admittedly having role as a decision maker is not easy since, very often, the process of decision  making is so complex. In addition, the demand for you to come up with a right decision, inevitably, situating you with a pressure that make the decision making process to be difficult. But you are the leader, you have to decide the direction. I think one of things, and the most important, you can do is not taking this responsibility independently. Remember, you have a wife. Work with her. Ask some suggestions. It will make the process of decision making to be easier.

The Risk of Fun

The Risk of Fun

It happened in 2012 when I was playing badminton. My partner–we played double–unintentionally hit me with his racket. Wow it was hard, the wound is showing it. Is it a bad luck to me? Yes, of course, it is a terrible misfortune. Nevertheless this experience has taught me something.

I call this “the risk of fun.” Life is risky. Even in something that we enjoy to do, we might find a risk. This photograph reminds me to expect any risk and be prepared to face it.